Advocacy, legislation, VAWA

I’m With Her: Reflections on the Women’s March

Like many of you, I traveled to Washington, DC on Saturday to stand with hundreds of thousands of women (and men!) who had something to say about the state of the world, America, politics, their bodies, and what’s on their mind. The Women’s March on Washington was a great day to be in DC. I brought along my feisty kid who participated in this incredible moment in time and shared it with me, some good friends who traveled and many others.

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Many people want to know why I went? I wanted to stand up for continued protections for women’s health and the health of all. I wanted to stand by women who have been politically marginalized by some. I wanted to stand up and say that the denigration of women and the trivialization of sexual assault should not be tolerated. And I wanted to stand with my daughter as her voice was amplified by 500,000 others (and millions more around the world) that their rights, their protections matter. 

But the final straw was this. On Friday the Trump Administration began discussions on proposed cuts to the US Department of Justice and elimination of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) the signature act signed into law in 1994 (drafted by Joe Biden) that has enabled protection for millions of victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. VAWA had bipartisan support when passed in 1994 and reauthorized by with bipartisan support in 2000 and 2005 and signed by then President George W. Bush.

Cutting VAWA would be devastating to millions, continues to send the wrong message, and must be stopped.  

And lest you think that BCAC and I are being partisan on an issue, read our 2012 Op-Ed when the Victims of Child Abuse Act fund was zeroed out by then President Obama. We made our voice known then as well and saved VOCAA.

Try and explain this one to your daughters, wives, sisters, mothers, and sons and brothers all who have been covered by this watershed legislation for over 20 years.

In the coming days, I’ll be sharing what you can do to Save VAWA (#SaveVAWA) and why it has been such an essential tool for protecting victims from violence, something I have dedicated my entire career to doing. BCAC’s growth as a program, includes helping teenagers who are victims of sexual violence, and children who witness domestic violence.

Saturday in DC was peaceful, poignant, funny, enlightening, empowering, and memorable. Some were there to stand up for women, some to stand up for causes, some to stand up against decisions already made by this Administration, and yes some against the President. But altogether this remarkable rally and all that comes next demonstrates that indeed, this is what democracy looks like.

Adam Rosenberg, Executive Director, January 22, 2017

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One thought on “I’m With Her: Reflections on the Women’s March

  1. Pingback: Action 1 of 10 : Save VAWA | Baltimore Child Abuse Center

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